Tag Archives: book marketing

FINDING SILVER LININGS AND SHARING TIPS

By Susan Wroble

RMC SCBWI’s PAL (Published and Listed) Liaison Rondi Frieder suggested a theme for the group’s March get-together as “Silver Linings from the Pandemic,” but the unexpected silver lining was all the resources and tips the members had to share.

Join a Debut or Launch Group:

If you have a book coming out, find or create a launch group. “It’s a lifesaver,” said Beth Anderson. “I don’t know how I could have made it through a debut year without that type of support,” Julie Rowan-Zoch said. Being able to collaborate and divide the work has allowed Julie’s group to present to a number of conferences and book festivals. The benefits were echoed by Megan Freeman, whose novel-in-verse Alone came out in January, and Jessica Speer, whose debut MG novel on happy friendships was pushed back from 2020 to this July.

Pursue Poetry:

“Poetry is the language of our heart that can come out in hard times,” Claudia Mills said. She tried a verse novel during the pandemic and learned she could write in a whole new way. Claudia suggests Molly Fisk’s occasional online poetry group, where the only rule is that comments must be positive. “I love being in a judgment-free zone.”

For Denise Vega, poetry was also a gateway to writing inspiration. Denise highly recommends Renée LaTulippe’s offerings, including Peek & Critique, a free service offered to all KidLit writers. Peek&Critique’s teaching videos include an introduction to poetry forms, lessons on meter and rhyme, scansion practice, and language-level analysis and critique of your submissions.

Support the Schools:

Many of the PAL members focused on how they could support teachers through this exceptionally difficult year. In her blog, author Julie Danneberg began to really concentrate on providing teaching resources. A therapist as well as an author, Carolee Dean was excited that her new book Story Frames for Teaching Literacy could be a real help for teachers working with kids struggling to read or in special education. Laura Roettinger provides science links for educators on her blog and features interviews with authors.

Carmela LaVigna Coyle had two recommendations regarding schools and author outreach. Scholars Unlimited looks for authors to read and record one of their books for students and families. Their mission is “to support low-income, academically struggling young learners. Contact twachtler@scholarsunlimited.org Carmela also noted that Nest Tijuana, a school and resource for children and families along the border, is in need of books in Spanish.

Beth Anderson suggests working with an Indie Bookshop to do a launch at a school. “There is a real audience of kids for the author, a valuable visit with an author for the kids, and a group for the store to target with their book sales. It’s a win-win-win.” For Megan Freeman, 70% of her school and library visit requests are coming through bookstores. Colorado is so fortunate to have so many great Indies, including Second Star to the Right, BookBar, Boulder Books, The Bookies, Firehouse Books, and of course, Tattered Cover.

Beth also noted that author Kate Messner puts together a list each year of authors and illustrators who are willing to do free events with schools in conjunction with World Real-Aloud Day (next scheduled for 2/2/22!). Lauren Kirstein also mentioned Kate Messner as a fabulous resource with her videos and information on virtual author visits. You can sign up here to be on Kate’s list of authors who offer free 15-minute virtual chats with classes or book clubs who have read one of their books.

Another resource Beth recommends is TeachingBooks.net. This is a free service with original, curated literary resources. Authors and illustrators can post short video clips introducing their books or telling people how to pronounce their name! As an example, here’s RMC-SCBWI Co-Regional Advisor Dow Phumiruk’s page.

Kimberlee Gard also suggests paying attention to special book-related days, like Read Across America Day (the next is 3/2/22). For Kimberlee and many of the PAL members, the ability to do virtual visits in places where you could not connect in person has been a real boost to creativity.

Beth Anderson had great success with An Open Book, a foundation with the goal of connecting authors and illustrators with Washington, DC-area students to build equitable access and nurture a lifelong love of reading. Beth’s presentation was free—but the foundation purchased a copy of her book for every child in the class. She also recommends signing up to be interviewed on the Reading with Your Kids podcast, with host Jed Doherty.

Learn Craft:

For many of the RMC-SCBWI PAL writers, this was a year to delve into craft. A huge silver lining of the pandemic was that so many opportunities became available because they were virtual—you could take classes from anywhere, often at reduced rates. As Fleur Bradley noted, in-person events can be exhausting, and being able to learn the material at the pace and times you wanted was a real blessing. Writers mentioned taking virtual classes and offerings from a number of places, including:

  • SCBWI (You can search by region or through their global events calendar, as most events this year are virtual).
  • The Writing Barn (classes, intensives, and retreats; located in Austin, Texas)
  • The Highlights Foundation (a range of courses, workshops, and retreats; located in the Pocono Mountains in Pennsylvania)
  • Free Expressions (supporting new and experienced writers with professional literary services and workshops)
  • The Inner Circle (a private Facebook group with nearly 10,000 members for new and established writers interested in the craft and practice of writing, offers coaching and accountability)
  • Udemy (offers online courses on pretty much everything; this link goes to their writing courses)

Make Connections:

Making connections, both real and virtual, was a repeated theme. Rondi Frieder is in a group that meets each week just to write. Those meetings, now virtual, continued throughout the pandemic. Laura Perdew measured six-foot distances and opened up her back yard to writers and gets together with other Boulder authors to talk and walk. And many of the authors supplied books to Laura, who was collecting for communities that had been ravaged by the fires. Kimberlee Gard put up a Little Free Library at her new home that really helped foster a sense of community. And many of the authors supplied books to Laura, who was collecting for communities that had been ravaged by the fires.

Fleur Bradley suggested on focusing subgroups and genres. She was able to do a lot of networking through Mystery Writers of America and Sisters in Crime. She also noted that Twitter’s ARC sharing groups have been invaluable. Likewise, Megan Freeman was blown away by how generous the MG Twitter community has been in terms of sharing resources.

Fleur and Beth Anderson both mentioned FlipGrid, which is a free video discussion experience. Beth noted that her short author video on FlipGrid led to free conversations with classes—and that those sometimes led to longer, paid presentations.

Stephanie and Jim Kroepfl stayed involved in activities with the Colorado Author’s League, and they discovered the joys of contests when their book Merged was awarded first place in the Science Fiction/Fantasy and Young Adult Fiction category — and then took the grand prize in the 2020 Royal Dragonfly Award by Story Monsters. “Emotionally,” Jim said, “this was a lifesaver!”

Nurture Yourself!

Without a commute, nature writer Susan Quinlan ended up with extra time, which she was happy to spend outdoors. She found that it was a year of experimentation, and she felt especially nurtured by being able to read sites tailored to things that interested her, through sites like Feedly.com.

For Jennifer Mason, the challenge of the year was how to move around a conflict and let yourself stay flexible and live and fresh. When her WFH books were put on hold, she started a mystery podcast for kids, Blister and Muck. She had to keep learning about recording, marketing, and promoting all while writing an unsolvable mystery story.

And if you need some inspiration, Lauren Kerstein had the perfect suggestion—bubble baths! “A bubble bath is like an idea fountain,” Lauren said. “I keep waterproof paper and my phone nearby to jot down ideas. It has solved so many creative problems.”

 

 

Photo by Vika Aleksandrova on Unsplash

 

 

8 Comments

Filed under craft advice, RMC-SCBWI, Susan Wroble

Pro Tips from the PALs

By Susan Wroble, September 2020

The themes that emerged from RMC-SCBWI’s PAL (Published and Listed) member Connect on Marketing Strategies on August 29th, were “build community” and “have fun!” But the PALs also had plenty of specific tips to share—hope you find some of them helpful in your journey!

SUPPORTING OTHERS:

1)         Review books. A simple and effective way to provide support to fellow authors and illustrators is to write a book review. You can use the same review for all sites. Amazon and Goodreads are the two most well-known sites for reviews, but there are plenty of others, including Barnes & Noble, LibraryThing, Shelfari, Bookish, and “What Should I Read Next.” Claudia Mills has set a goal is to review one of her friend’s books each week.

2)         Nominate for Lists on Goodreads. Lauren Kerstein recommended nominating books to be on Goodreads Listopia, because it increases visibility. I learned the process by nominating Laura Perdew’s picture book, The Fort, to a list called “Picture Books About Friendship.” The steps:

  • Log into your Goodreads account
  • Make sure that the book you want to nominate is on your shelf
  • Navigate to lists (under Browse) and scroll down. Find “search lists”
  • Find an appropriate list for the book and go to that list
  • Near the top is a button that reads “Add books to this list.”

3)         Give Shout-outs to others. Julie Rowan-Zoch has a unique—and fabulous—way of giving shout-outs to others. She acknowledges her friend’s birthdays on Facebook with a drawing. As Julie freely admits, the drawings are her daily art practice, but as RMC-SCBWI PAL Liaison Rondi Frieder commented, seeing them with a birthday greeting really makes the day special!

MARKETING/PUBLISHING PLAN:

1)         Spread the Word. “Don’t be afraid to be a little obnoxious!” Fleur Bradley said. You have to let people know that you a book coming out for them to be able to support you! She was nervous about the timing of her book launch in the midst of the pandemic. But she bought some Facebook ads to create awareness and excitement, then hosted a virtual book birthday, complete with cake. Susan Quinlan also spoke of the importance of reaching out. When she did, she was surprised at the number of old friends who wanted to buy her book.

2)         Create a Marketing or Publishing Plan. Jean Reidy created her own publishing plan to send to her publicist. It includes specifics on what she will do online, as well as with conferences and festivals, schools, libraries and bookstores, postcards, and contract marketing. Jean recommended asking if your publisher would pitch you for the Mountains and Plains Independent Booksellers Association. It’s a way to get in front of hundreds of booksellers in this region.

As a marketing professor for Colorado Mountain College, Jessica Speer is even more at home in the marketing world than the book world. She created a detailed marketing plan, starting six months before the publication date, and ending six months after. She uses the plan as a storage place for all her marketing ideas, including which podcasts or magazines to pitch.

3)        Join a Promotional Book Group. Several PAL members talked about the many benefits of joining a promotional group. Leslie Vedder said that members of her group found each other through the Publisher’s Weekly rights reports.

4)         Enlist the Bookstores. We are so fortunate that the Rocky Mountain region has phenomenal independent bookstores. Andrea Wang and Dow Phumirik each spoke of the importance of getting to know the bookstores. Dow noted that BookBar and Second Star to the Right are both in need of need of virtual content and appreciate any help. Second Star will be doing an educator’s night in October.

5)         Send out ARCS wisely. Megan Freeman suggested Googling the top ten children’s book bloggers in your given genres. You can find which have the greatest reach before asking if they’d review your book.

6)         Write a Press Release. Former journalist Lydia Shoaf wrote a press release for her book and sent it to her local Arvada paper. At first, there wasn’t much traction, but then it was picked up by surrounding papers. Those links were shared on neighborhood groups. Then it was publicized by the local bookstore—and in the school district newsletter.

7)         Use your Research. Some of Beth Anderson’s best marketing tools were an outgrowth of her research. The museum she asked to vet one of her books then hosted a program featuring her books.

8)         Create a Newsletter. YA author Carolee Dean puts together a monthly newsletter with updates, activities, and tips about writing and working with students. The newsletter, which goes out via email, then points to content on her blog, Twitter, or Facebook pages.

9)         Enter Contests. Linda Osmundson got visibility for her newest book by entering it into contests.

10)       Use your Publisher! Amazon has both a self-publishing arm (Kindle Direct Publishing) and a more traditional publishing arm. Ellen Javernick, whose books are with Two Lions, the Amazon publishing imprint for children up to age 12, said that she has had to do very little—because Amazon is doing the marketing work!

HELPFUL APPS:

1)         Learn to use Apps for Design, Graphics, and SEO. Jessica Speer pointed to Pinterest as a hidden gem, with a lot of success for relatively little effort. Other tools she uses include the design site Canva for graphics, Animoto for videos, and the back plug-in Yoast, a search engine optimization tool that forces you to create keywords and use formats that Google prefers. Jessica went through all of her old posts with Yoast, and is now seeing increased traffic.

2)         Get more Mileage with Posts and Hashtags. Megan Freeman recommends using the social media landing page Linktree, which allows multiple hyperlinks and the ability to go beyond character limitations. She also recommends harnessing the power of hashtags, by researching their numbers of followers.

3)         Sign up for Google alerts. Pat Vojta suggests signing up for Google alerts on your name and the title of your books. She found her book on the front cover of a newspaper that way!

GIVING BACK AND HAVING FUN:

1)         Give Content. As a former teacher, Julie Danneberg is doing everything she can to support teachers in this COVID era—and for her, that means creating content that they can use in their classes to get a break! Her website has a special section just for teachers.

2)         Scour the Pages. Author Carmela LaVigna Coyle studied the art on every page of her books. Unknown to her, there were themes, including frogs and pollinators. Using these, she developed crafts, including bookmarks and finger puppets, that serve as another marketing tool.

3)         Create Videos and Podcasts. Inspired by Trevor Noah, Jennifer Mason launched a storytelling podcast in April, called “Blister and Muck.” At first, she said, the only people who listened were her friends. But then there was a 50% uptick and another. Judy Kundert has been telling stories with her husband acting as videographer. And Gregory Barrington gave a sneak peek at his first, and incredible, book trailer.

Let us know what you find most useful, and add your own tips in the comments. Thanks!

2 Comments

Filed under Susan Wroble

Marketing Long Before Your Book is Published (And maybe before it is written!)

By Susan Wroble

I used to believe that writing came first, and marketing later. Big Mistake! It is easiest if you learn both simultaneously — they build on each other. Here are a few tips on starting your marketing journey long before your book is published…

Establish writing credentials.

An easy place to start is to write for newsletters. Many groups have regular on-line updates and are delighted to have a member feature or presentation review. For example, when I joined the Denver Rose Society, I knew nothing about growing roses, so I took notes at the meetings. It was easy to turn those presentation notes into short articles for their newsletter. Bonus — I didn’t know the national organization gave writing awards until I got three of them!

Why?

  • Simple — Agents and editors want to see that you write.

Create a blog.

When my writing group, the Story Spinners, created this blog, our goal was simply to push ourselves to learn a new skill. By sharing, we each posted about once a quarter, and we split the costs.

Why?

  • Blogging counts as writing credentials — even if your readership is close to zero!
  • You have a platform that agents and editors can get a feel for your writing and commitment to the industry.
  • A few of the posts have been expanded and been published in paying markets.

Read with purpose.

Read current books in your genre — the key word being “current.” There are blogs for every genre, but one of my favorite ways to find new kids’ books in general (after making friends with librarians!) is through IndieBound, a community of independent local bookstores. IndieBound puts out a quarterly newsletter called “Kids’ Next.” You can pick up a print copy at an independent bookseller, or find it on-line. As an added benefit, it is a fabulous resource for gifts for the kids in your life.

Why?

  • By reading with purpose, you can start analyzing, and learn how other authors have created an arc, or added layers, or built tension…
  • You learn what’s current and what is selling.
  • You learn what is already out there for subjects you want to write about.

Keep a reading log.

Record the author, illustrator (if applicable), publisher, and whatever else is important to you. I find it helpful to snap a picture of the cover. Here’s an example:

Why?

  • You learn the style of various publishing houses.
  • You can track books that are mentor texts.
  • You can track books that are comps for works in progress.

Study and track agents and publishers.

One easy way to research agents and editors is to subscribe to the free twice-weekly Publisher’s Weekly newsletter, Children’s Bookshelf. Other ways to study agents are through the sites Manuscript Wish List or QueryTracker. Here’s a Publisher’s Weekly rights announcement for my friend, author Jocelyn Rish:

Next, track the notices with agents or editors that seem like a good fit for your work. Like my reading log, I created a table in Word. For this table, I record the publishing house, editor, author and title, and the agent who represented the author.

Why?

  • You end up with a perfectly tailored list of agents and editors who represent and publish the type of work that you do.

Use Facebook.

Author Beth Anderson (LIZZIE DEMANDS A SEAT) recently spoke at the Rocky Mountain Chapter of SCBWI’s Denver South Connect & Critique. “I didn’t want to get on Facebook,” she said, “and now I can’t imagine not using it.”

Why?

  • The Groups feature. Instead of scrolling endlessly through a jumble of posts from assorted friends and distant relatives interspersed with ads, you can go directly to a group — think RMC-SCBWI, KidLit411, StoryStorm, 12×12, ReFoReMo, NF Fest…
  • These groups are the easiest places to learn about upcoming events, celebrate successes, and build community. You’ll need that community when your book is ready to debut.

I hope there’s a nugget in this post you find useful. And for you — what are the marketing tips you wish you had known early in your writing journey?

Leave a Comment

Filed under craft advice, Susan Wroble