Monthly Archives: July 2019

Bookstore Finds

I recently took a stroll through the children’s department at my local bookstore and picked up several good reads that I had to share. Two of the books are adaptations of other stories, and the last one was an original.

The Night Before the Fourth of July by Natasha Wing caught my eye. I realize I’m a little late for a pre Fourth of July read, but it’s a good summertime book. The family in the story start the day by putting on their festive red, white, and blue then take off for all the favorite Fourth of July activities including a parade, BBQ, and fireworks at the end. The story told is in rhyme and Amy Wummer has amazing art to accompany this spin off of the classic, The Night Before Christmas.

There Was An Old Astronaut Who Swallowed the Moon! by Lucille Colandro does a great job of  highlighting some of the sights you can see in space. From the moon, to stars, comets, and satellites, the astronaut devours everything in the universe. In the classic tale, There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly, the old lady swallows things that are progressively larger, until she dies, of course. This version deviates from that format but is entertaining and has facts about space included as back matter.

I Wish You More by Amy Krouse Rosenthal & Tom Lichtenheld is told in the light of seeing the glass half full through the prospective of a child. The repetitive phrase, I wish you more, is used to highlight overcoming some of childhood’s challenges like kite flying, tying shoes, and keeping your head above water in the deep end. And finding joy in the simple things. It’s told in a playful way that keeps the story moving all the way to the heartfelt end.

What are your favorite summertime stories?

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THE SQUIBBY NOTEBOOK

By Susan Wroble

Over the years, I’ve attended a lot of conferences and workshops, but after this year’s Spring RMC-SCBWI conference, I felt that what I needed most was some way to organize the information so that it would stay relevant and useful.

That’s when it hit. I already knew how to do this! About a dozen years ago, I had taken training in document organization. In addition to writing for children, I moderate a support group for parents whose kids are twice exceptional (2e). These are highly gifted students with a myriad of learning differences, and anyone who has a special needs kid knows that the paperwork mounts quickly. There are medical reports, 504s and IEPs, neuropsych evaluations… the list is endless. In my role as facilitator, I had attended a WrightsLaw Special Education Conference, where a major part of the conference was teaching parents to manage the papers.

And so, with a nod to both dyslexia, which is a frequent piece of the 2e puzzle, and my critique group, who affectionately refers to SCBWI as “Squibby,” I present to you THE SQUIBBY NOTEBOOK, also known as Children’s Writing Resources.

You’ll need a big three-ring binder (preferably the type with plastic outside that lets you slip a paper into the front and back covers and spine), a hole punch and a pencil. Slide something eye catching in the front plastic sleeve (I use a page from an SCBWI calendar) and make a label for the spine (my label says “The Squibby Notebook”).

The hardest — and most valuable — part of this system is the Table of Contents. Create a spreadsheet (landscape orientation) with the following five columns:

  • Date
  • Name
  • Title/Profession
  • Document Type
  • Notes

 

Make a header for the Table of Contents that reads “Children’s Writing Resources.” And then start filling in information on the spreadsheet. The “Notes” section is the most important. That’s where you connect the dots, linking this document to one or more of your works in progress. The notes section reminds you of why that document is important.

And then you file documents chronologically: oldest in front, newest at the back. With the pencil, date each document on the bottom right-hand corner. One of the beauties of this system is that each time you attend a webinar, workshop, or conference, you update that Table of Contents, and in the process review what the notebook holds. You’ll know which agents and editors you’ve seen and when you saw them. And with luck, by keeping the lessons at the top of your brain, and the documents corralled, you’ll shorten that journey from idea to publication. Happy filing!

 

 

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