Monthly Archives: October 2018

Terrific Terrifying Titles for Halloween

Looking for the perfect Halloween picture book to get your little goblins and ghouls ready for the holiday? I stopped by my local bookstore to see what was on the shelf. There is no small supply of hauntingly good spooky stories (but not too spooky). Here are a few of my favorites.

You remember the classic, Goodnight Moon? The Halloween sister title is Goodnight Goon. Saying goodnight to all of the things you’d expect to find in a dark and dreaded dungeon, will be the perfect bedtime story for all of your little monsters.

If you have little mummies who aren’t ready to say goodnight, they would love to have one last game of hide and seek with mommy mummy. One brave baby mummy isn’t afraid of the things that go rattle and shake in the dark. But, what happens when mommy mummy finds the perfect hiding spot? Will baby mummy still be brave?

Readers beware: you think you know what you’re getting into when you start reading Creepy Carrots, but looks can be deceiving. Baby bunny is trying to keep those creepy carrots trapped. But who set the best trap of all?

One good book deserves a squeal. If you couldn’t get enough of Creepy Carrots,  then your little pumpkins  may also enjoy Creepy Pair of Underwear!  The brave little bunny is back and this time he’s battling creepy underwear.  Just like with the carrots, he has a plan for the underwear.

What are your favorite Halloween titles?

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CRITIQUING: Just One More Thing…

By Susan Wroble

 The goal: Critique without overwhelming.

The problem? It’s really tricky.

The solution: Just one more thing…

With the talented author Judith Robbins Rose (Look Both Ways in the Barrio Blanco), I feel very fortunate to lead one of the Connect Groups for the Rocky Mountain Chapter of SCBWI. Our Denver South Connect & Critique follows a model of craft presentation followed by critique break-outs. For some of our members, who are brand new to children’s writing and SCBWI, these critiques are the first time someone else has seen their work. They are being critiqued by whoever ends up in their circle, from other new writers to ones with years of experience.

In sessions like our Connect, as in many critique groups, the critiques come in two forms: written and oral. In an intensive at the Rocky Mountain Chapter of the SCBWI conference this year, author Laurie Halse Anderson offered her advice on the topic. She recommends restricting written comments in a critique to two types — smiley faces and question marks. I admire the simplicity of this approach, and the gentleness. From what I have seen, however, most of the problems in critiquing come not from the written review, but from the oral comments.

For years, at SCBWI conferences, I attended the “First Pages” sessions. The guest editor or agent would listen, along with the audience, as first pages of manuscripts were drawn from a pile and read aloud.  And then the editor or agent would give their initial impressions. Each year, I was reminded that the job of deciding which works to represent is very different from the job of mentoring and encouraging a writer. Our guest speakers had a tough job, and few did it well. Even though the submissions were anonymous, their analysis could feel devastating.

Likewise, our initial Connects faced a rough start. Now, we review the sandwich method before each critique session. In this method, constructive criticism is tucked between positive starting and ending comments. It’s so easy to visualize that it makes a great first approach. But it didn’t feel complete. It could still be overwhelming. And it didn’t feel that it did the job of helping writers, especially new writers, know where to begin to focus to improve their craft.

Drawing on her years of competing on the university debate team, Judy Rose had an insight regarding her coach’s approach to her entry in after-dinner speaking. “Even though he’d heard my piece dozens of times before, he’d laugh — and sometimes cry — and say “That’s great! It’s fabulous! There’s just one more thing…””

“Just One More Thing.” I love it. It feels like the sandwich method has just found the essential missing ingredient it lacked.

 

For more ideas about writing and receiving critiques, I found the following post from The Writer’s Loft especially helpful: https://www.thewritersloft.org/critique

 

 

 

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