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Author Interview with Denise Vega

By Denise Schurr

Denise Vega is the award-winning author of seven books from toddler to teen, including her newest picture book, If Your Monster Won’t Go To Bed as well as Build a Burrito: A Counting Book in English and Spanish, illustrated by Caldecott Medal winner David Diaz and Grandmother, Have the Angels Come? illustrated by Erin Eitter Kono (Colorado Book Award winner, Colorado Authors’ League Award, Américas Award Commended Title). Denise is a former co-Regional Advisor for the Rocky Mountain Chapter of the SCBWI, on faculty at Lighthouse Writers Workshop, and a Young Adult Mentor for the Regis University MFA in Creative Writing. She lives in Denver with her family where she loves to hike, walk, swim, read, eat French fries and watch out for monsters. Find out more about Denise, her books, and her idiosyncrasies at www.denisevega.com.

What was your inspiration for the story If Your Monster Won’t Go To Bed?

I can’t remember exactly, but I think it was a combination of things. I had written another monster story and also a “role switching” story with kids putting parents to bed–an idea that I abandoned when I found out it had already been done by a much more skilled author than myself. I think my subconscious started putting these two ideas together at some point and the story began to prod me.

Which came first, the characters or the plot? How did you blend the two?

The plot came first–this idea of an instruction manual for putting your monster to bed. Then I heard the unseen narrator’s voice in my head. I had originally envisioned the story with dialogue bubbles coming in from the sides and then maybe getting a glimpse of the narrator slipping away at the end. But that changed as I continued to hone and revise the story. Because of the second person point of view, the characters are actually the narrator and the listener/reader (represented by the girl in the story) with the narrator taking center stage in terms of voice and the girl coming into her own through the text and a lot through the illustrations. The ending reflects me coming to terms with these two characters. Early versions ended with the child playing after the monster is (supposedly) in bed, but something didn’t feel quite right with that approach. It wasn’t until I circled back to the narrator at the end that I got that “Yes!” feeling and knew I’d found my ending.

What was your favorite part to write and why?

I had so much fun coming up with all the silly things that were the opposite of when you put a kid to bed and loved creating the hyphenated words! It was just a big Wordplay Fun Fest!

Can you share your favorite line?

My favorite line by far is the last line after the narrator tells listeners not to ask their parents for help: “It’s not their fault; they’re just not good at it.” It still makes me smile when I read it.

Were you afraid of monsters when growing up?

Yes! I was convinced there was one in my closet and I often did the popular leaping from afar onto my bed in case there was a monster lurking under the bed–I didn’t want it reaching out and grabbing my foot! Sometimes if I woke up in the middle of the night, I would think my bookcase was one. Oh my gosh. Writing all of
that down makes it sound like I believed there was a whole family of monsters living in my room! Good grief.

OTHER INFO:

Denise will be sharing the story and activities at several locations around Denver and Boulder. Visit her Facebook Fan page to find an event close to you. https://www.facebook.com/pg/denise.vega.books/events

@denisevegabooks

More about the book and purchase options: http://www.denisevega.com/books/if-your-monster/

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